Minimum Formatting  Instructions

For All Student Work

 

Use these guidelines to format written work in this class.

  • Write on every other line.

  • Do not put extra lines between sections of writing.

  • Stay out of the margins on both sides.

  • Stay out of the bottom three spaces.

  • Do not use the back side of paper.

  • Use only wide or college ruled filler paper that is free of doodles, tears or smudges.

  • Put the title of the assignment in a text box, centered near the top of the page.

  • Copy the contents of the title just as I have put on the whiteboard.

  • Put your first name and last initial up in the left-hand corner.

  • Put the period under your name and last initial.

  • Put the date under the period.

Writing will take place, for the most part, inside the classroom, by hand.  Students will be given an opportunity to use word processing, but may need to rely more on hand written work, when the use of a computer becomes a problem that could interfere with finishing work by the assigned due date. Students may bring their own laptops.

Writing Workshop I

Writing With an Organized Outline

Writing Workshop II

Plagiarism Research Paper

Writing Workshop III

Autobiographical Incident Essay with Dialogue

Writing Workshop IV

Response to Literature

Click the link under Text Book Selection to hear the audio file.

AUDIO SCHEDULE

 
 

DISC

TRACK

TEXT BOOK SELECTION

AUTHOR

TIME

PAGE

1

1-2

from The Giants House

Elizabeth McCracken

11:33

7

 

4-6

The Washwoman

Isaac Bashevis Singer

14:35

26

 

7

New Directions

Maya Angelou

4:37

35

 

8-11

Sonata for Harp and Bicycle

Joan Aiken

21:38

48

 

12-13

The Cask of Amontillado

Edgar Allan Poe

9:13

61

2

1-2

The Cask of Amontillado

Edgar Allen Poe

8:39

Cont.

 

YouTube

Checkouts

Cynthia Rylant

9:13

74

 

4-6

The Girl Who Can

Ama Ata Aidoo

12:39

78

 

YouTube

from A White House Diary 

Lady Bird Johnson

10:48

98

 

9-11

My English

Julia Alvarez

13:24

107

 

YouTube

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty

James Thurber

12:27

124

3

1-2

If I Forget You Oh Earth

Arthur C Clarke

10:35

148

 

4-7

The Jade Peony

Wayson Choy

22:43

187

 

YouTube

American History

Judith Ortiz Cofer

20:30

202

 

YouTube

The Most Dangerous Game

Richard Connell

53:14

215

5

YouTube

The Necklace

Guy de Maupassant

19:34

294

6

5-8

Blues Aint No Mockin’ Bird

Toni Cade Bambara

17:46

322

 

YouTube

The Invalid’s Story

Mark Twain

20:10

333

 

YouTube

The Scarlet Ibis

James Hurst

31:02

350

 

6-7

The Golden Kite, The Silver Wind

Ray Bradbury

12:12

362

 

8-10

Before Hip-Hop Was hip-Hop

Rebecca Walker

12:37

391

8

6-7

Single Room, Earth View

Sally Ride

11:38

437

9

8

The Talk

Gary Soto

5:36

522

 

9

Uncoiling

Pat Mora

1:09

555

 

10

A Voice

Pat Mora

1:58

557

 

11

Dream Deferred

Langston Hughes

0:46

566

 

12

Dreams

Langston Hughes

0:25

567

 

13

I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud

William Wordsworth

1:19

568

 

14

Meciendo/Rocking

Gabriela Mistral

0:27

570

 

15

Sonnets on Love XIII

Jean de Sponde

0:59

573

 

16

All Watched Over By Machines of Loving Grace

Richard Brautigan

0:54

577

 

17

“Hope” is the thing with feathers

Emily Dickinson

   :33

578

 

18

The War Against Trees

Stanley Kunitz

1:28

580

 

19

Summer

Walter Dean Myers

0:30

592

 

20

The Eagle

Alfred, Lord Tennyson

0:30

593

 

21

Analysis of Baseball

May Swenson

1:12

594

 

22

The Bells

Edgar Allen Poe

4:19

599

 

23

Slam, Dunk, & Hook

Yusef Komunyakaa

1:34

604

 

24

Jabberwocky

Lewis Carroll

1:23

606

 

25

There Is No Word for Goodbye

Mary Tallmountain

0:56

614

 

26

Blackberry Eating

Galeay Kinnell

0:54

615

 

27

Daily

Naomi Shihab Nye

0:54

616

 

28

Casey at the Bat

Ernest Lawrence Thayer

4:14

631

10

1

Fifteen

William Stafford

1:13

633

 

2

Twister Hits Houston

Sandra Cisneros

0:58

635

 

YouTube

The Raven

Edgar Allen Poe

10:06

639

 

5

The Horses

Edwin Muir

3:06

644

 

6

The Writer

Richard Wilbur

2:03

646

 

7

We never know how high we are

Emily Dickinson

0:23

659

 

8

The Road Not Taken

Robert Frost

1:14

661

 

9

Fire and Ice

Robert Frost

0:28

667

 

10

maggie and milly and mollie and may

E.E. Cummings

0:51

668

 

11

The Seven Ages of Man

William Shakespeare

2:09

671

 

12

Women

Alice Walker

0:36

678

 

13

Three Haiku

Basho and Chiyojo

0:31

679

 

14

I Hear America Singing

Walt Whitman

1:29

681

 

15

Sonnet 30

William Shakespeare

0:58

682

 

16-19

The Shakespeare Stealer

Gary L. Blackwood

19:48

724

 

YouTube

The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet Act I (1/2)

William Shakespeare

long

N/A

   

The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet Act I (2/2)

 

 

 

    The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet Act II (1/2)      
    The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet Act II (2/2)      
    The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet Act III (1/2)      
    The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet Act III (2/2)      
    The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet Act IV      
    The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet Act V      
 

3

Pyramus and Thisbe

Ovid

5:42

858

 

4-5

from A Midsummer Night’s Dream

William Shakespeare

12:36

863

 

9

The Inspector General

Anton Chekhov

8:15

884

 

10-12

from The Importance of Being Earnest

Oscar Wilde

13:29

898

14

1

from The Big Kiss

Henry Alford

9:05

906

 

2

Play Hard; Play Together; Play Smartfrom The Carolina Way

Dean Smith

8:13

939

 

SoundCloud

from The Odyssey, Part 1

Homer

52:04

950

 

SoundCloud

from The Odyssey, Part 2

Homer

41:42

993

 

11

An Ancient Gesture

Edna St. Vincent Millay

1:26

1028

 

12

Siren Song

Margaret Atwood

1:56

1030

 

13

Prologue and Epilogue from the Odyssey

Derek Walcott

2:56

1032

 

14

Ithaca

Constantine Cavafy

2:16

1035

 

15-16

Three Skeleton Key

George Toudouze

11:06

1050

16

1-3

Three Skeleton Key

George Toudouze

16:44

Cont.

17

1

There is a Longing

Chief Dan George

2:00

1100

 

2

Glory and Hope

Nelson Mandela

7:21

1105

 

7-10

Perseus

Edith Hamilton

19:19

1121

Important Literary Terms

term/device

 

definition

act

 

a part of a play larger than a scene

Allegory

 

a story that has two levels of messages, one that is real, and one that is intellectual

Alliteration

 

repetition of the first consonant sound in a word

Allusion

 

a reference to something the majority of people will be familiar with

Antagonist

 

the person, or force, that is in conflict with the main character

Archetype

 

a type of character present in literature from all places and times

Autobiography

 

a story or book a person writes about his or her life

biography

 

A story or book a person writes about another person’s life

characters

 

the people in a story

Characterization

 

the four ways a narrator explains who a character in a story is: what the person says, does and thinks, and how others respond to him or her.

Climax

 

the highest point of a story which is followed with falling action and a resolution

discriptive writing

 

fiction or non-fiction writing that is rich in imagery

dialogue

 

verbal exchange between two people

Dramatic irony

 

irony that happen when the reader knows something that the other people in the story do not know (yet)

Dynamic character

 

a character who learns a lesson, or changes

expository writing

 

non-fictional writing that is mostly information

external conflict

 

conflict that is physical

Internal conflict

 

conflict that is within the spirit, mind, and/or emotions

foil

 

a character who contrasts with the protagonist

foreshadowing

 

hints in a story about what will happen later

Haiku

 

a Japanese form of poetry that has 17 syllables, in three lines of 5, 7, and 5 words.

hyperbole

 

an exaggerated statement or claim not meant to be taken literally

internal conflict

 

conflict that happen with in the emotions, spirit, or feelings of a person

external conflict

 

conflict that comes from   a physical source

fiction

 

writing that is made up

flat character

 

a character who has only one side or mood throughout a story

historical fiction

 

fictional writing that is based on true event

Lyric poem

 

song-like poetry expressing feelings

meter

 

the musical beat within a poem created by stressed and unstressed syllables

monologue

 

a long speech made by a character in a play that is heard by other characters

Narrative poem

 

a poem that tells a story

narrative writing

 

writing that tells a story

Novel

 

a piece of literature that tells a story and takes longer than one sitting to read

non-fiction

 

writing that is factual

onomatopoeia

 

this happens with saying a word, creates the sound that the word means

oxymoron

 

a word that expresses two things that are opposite , like cold sun or hot ice.

Persuasive writing

 

non-fiction writing that has the purpose of changing the reader’s opinion

personification

 

this occurs when something that is non-human is given human characteristics

parallelism

 

the repetition of the way something is listed: I love candy, like spaghetti, and hate fried spiders- - -instead of- - -Candy is something I love, I have a feeling of liking spaghetti, and hate spiders.

plot

 

the rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution of a story

point of view

 

one of three ways a fictional story is told; first person, second person limited and second person omniscient

protagonist

 

the main character of a story

reflective writing

 

non-fictional writing that includes the authors feelings about the subject

Round character

 

a character who has many moods or sides

scene

 

part of an act

setting

 

the time and place a story takes place

soliloquy

 

a speech given by an actor, that the other characters do not hear

sonnet

 

a specific type of poetry that has 14 lines, with a rhyme scheme of ab, ab, cd,cd,eg,ef, gg,gg.

static character

 

a character who learns nothing, or never changes during the course of a story

universal theme

 

a lesson that is relevant to everyone at any time. . . a lesson about human nature.

voice

 

the way a story creates a tone or feeling

Be PUNCTUAL  
be-punctual           Be POLITE        
be-polite 
         
Be PREPARED
be-prepared   

Be PROACTIVE
& PARTICIPATE

be-proactive-and-participate 

 

 

be-punctual PUNCTUAL

• This means to be in in your seat with your warm-up paper out and other needed materials at your desk.
• One of the consequences for failure to meet this expectation is lost

 

be-polite

POLITE
• Stay alert.  Do not put your head down on your desk.  Sit up straight.  Take your hat or hood off.
• Do not socialize, unless it is part of an assigned task.
• Do not start a conversation with the office staff when they enter the room.
• Do not get out of your seat without permission, unless it is an emergency. Raise your hand if you have a question or comment to contribute.
• Do not ask “me questions” in “we times.”

 

be-prepared PREPARED
• Arrive with several writing tools, eraser or white-out, lined filler paper.  Do not use the tear-out kind of paper.
• Check the board to see what classroom supplies you will need, and get these before you sit down.
• Arrive to class with hydration and restroom needs taken care of.
• Arrive in class well rested.  If you look sleepy, I will work with your parent or guardian to find a solution.
• Do not be obstinate, argumentative or incorrigible.
• When you disagree with someone’s viewpoint, do so in a mature and tactful manner, and remember that it is good to know the reasons that other people see things differently than we ourselves may see them.  Your goal in voicing your side of a disagreement should be two-fold; first, to make your position and consequently yourself, better understood; secondly, for you to better understand the position of a reasonably intelligent counter view.  Your goal should not be to make the world agree with you, assuming those who disagree must be asinine.
• Comply with all district and school-wide rules.
• Do not yawn, sneeze, or otherwise make noises as loudly as you can.
• Do not pack up before I tell you to. (I really, really, do not like that!”
• Do not insult one another.
• Do not swear.
• Do not constantly look at the clock.
• Keep your phone or other electronic device, OFF AND AWAY.
• Behave in class the same way you would behave is the adults who love you were sitting right next to you.

 

be-proactive-and-participate PROACTIVE & PARTICIPATE
• Stay focused and alert.  Use self-discipline to assure you are thinking about what you should be thinking about.  This is a skill that takes practice.  The more you consciously bring your mind back to the appropriate focus, the easier it is.  At some point, it will become automatic.
• Contribute to class contributions by asking questions, voicing comments, doing your part when working with a group or partner

Like to know more?

 SCHOOL ADDRESS

4200 Academic Drive
New Bern, North Carolina 28562
 
 
 
 

Need to talk to me

Phone: (252) 528 0255
Email: tamara.tilus@cravenk12.org


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